Gene Vincent Lonely Street Forum

Gene Vincent Forum FAN CLUB
 
HomeHome  PortailPortail  RegisterRegister  Log in  

Share | 
 

 Interview de Dickie Harrel

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
AuthorMessage
Admin Lee-Loo
Admin


Female Nombre de messages : 6995
Localisation : Pyrénées
Date d'inscription : 2007-01-06
Age : 51
Emploi : Fondateur/presidente Lonely Street site/forum/fanClub

PostSubject: Interview de Dickie Harrel   27.11.08 15:24

J'ai trouvé cette interview de Dickie
si qqun peut nous la traduire ça serait


Dickie Harrell at the 1999 Viva Las Vegas rockabilly festival, and Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps in 1957. Clockwise from top left: Harrell, Vincent, guitarist Johnny Meeks, bass player Bill Mack and "Clapper Boys" Paul Peek and Tommy Facenda.
A conversation with Dickie "Be-Bop" Harrell
The original drummer for Gene Vincent's Blue Caps remembers life in one of rockabilly's rowdiest bands, and his friend Paul Peek.
- - - - - - - - - - - -
By King Kaufman
April 12, 2001 | Dickie "Be-Bop" Harrell was the original drummer for Gene Vincent's Blue Caps. His restrained brush playing and background screams on Vincent's first and most famous hit, "Be-Bop-A-Lula," gave that record -- one of the signature records of early rock 'n' roll -- much of its tension and feel.
Like Vincent a native of Norfolk, Va., Harrell began playing with Vincent when he was only 15 years old. Vincent, then in the Navy, had badly injured his leg in a motorcycle accident, and was recuperating at a Navy hospital. Harrell stayed with the Blue Caps for a little more than a year before quitting, bored with life on the road. Vincent and the Blue Caps had a falling out over money at the end of the '50s, and Vincent, already crippled from his earlier injury, was hurt again in the car accident that killed Eddie Cochran, a friend and fellow early rock star. His fortunes faded in the United States, but he remained a popular live act in England, where he was a hero to, among others, the Beatles, whose early black leather look was an imitation of Vincent.




Vincent died in 1971, alcoholic and mostly forgotten. He was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1998.
Dickie Harrell worked in hazardous materials for the government for 37 years before retiring two years ago. He now sells Blue Caps-related merchandise. Over the years, four of the surviving Blue Caps -- Harrell, guitar player Johnny Meeks and singers Tommy Facenda and Paul Peek -- have occasionally reunited to play Vincent's hits at rockabilly festivals and other shows. I met them when my band played on bills with them during a weeklong tour of California in 1996. This week Harrell spoke with me by phone from his home in Portsmouth, Va., about Vincent and Peek, who died recently at age 63.
How'd you hook up with Gene when you were only 15?
Well, I was playing music at that time with one of the bands at the radio station, WCMS. I used to go over there all the time after school. They used to have this show, and Sheriff [Tex] Davis, he was the one that was in charge of it, and he told me one day, he said, "We got this sailor comin' over here wants to sing this weekend." Says, "He broke his leg so he's over there at the hospital. He'll be over here probably Friday. You get a chance, come on over and I'll introduce you." So I went over there Friday, and Gene came up on the elevator and he had both crutches, and the damn leg was all in plaster of Paris and everything. And we talked and this and that and everything, and he sang a couple of songs.
And after he left Bill [Sheriff Tex] said, "What'd you think?" and I said, "Eh, sounds good!" So we got together and got to the place [for a show], 'cause we used to back up some of the guys on the show, the band did. And the first night there, Bill Davis went out there and told them who he was, and told them that they had this guy comin' out there who was in the Navy, and over here in the hospital and all this stuff, and he [Vincent] went out there and did his thing, and, man, he drove 'em crazy. They went crazy. Because they just weren't used to seeing stuff like that, especially for Gene, 'cause he would sing, and with his leg like it was, and he'd mess with the microphone and all this good stuff. So from then on, every week, man, it just got to the point that the place was triple jampacked, and if you didn't get there in plenty of time for the show you didn't get in



_________________
Vous etes ici sur le forum
VISITEZ LONELY STREET :

GENE VINCENT
--- NEW !! / http://gene.vincent.fanclub.voila.net/


Le Fan Club Lonely Street sur Myspace international :
http://www.myspace.com/genevincentfanclubfr
RETROUVEZ NOUS SUR FACEBOOK !! http://www.facebook.com/pages/GENE-VINCENT-FAN-CLUB/228785458542
Gene's life year bu year with pictures !

MAIL Joindre Lonely Street : genevincentfrance@yahoo.fr



Lee-Loo
Back to top Go down
Admin Lee-Loo
Admin


Female Nombre de messages : 6995
Localisation : Pyrénées
Date d'inscription : 2007-01-06
Age : 51
Emploi : Fondateur/presidente Lonely Street site/forum/fanClub

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   27.11.08 15:25




[Sheriff Tex Davis' friendship with Ken Nelson at Capitol Records helped Vincent get a recording contract.] But see they didn't want the band, Ken Nelson; all he wanted was Gene, because they had the best musicians in the world. And Bill talked him into using the band. He said, "Try 'em." He said if it don't work, send 'em home. So we all got together and figured out what we was gonna do, and went on out there [to Nashville], and went to the studio and met Mr. Nelson and Owen Bradley, and they had all these damn musicians sittin' around. And I asked Cliff [Gallup, the Blue Caps' original guitar player], I said, "What the hell's goin' on here?" He said, "I don't know. I guess they're finishing up on a session or whatever." So they were sittin' on the side of the studio, and Gene done two or three verses of "Race With the Devil" and "Be-Bop-A-Lula" and everything, and Ken Nelson come out the thing there and said, "All right, y'all can go on home now." So, hell, I thought he was talking to us. So I started unpacking. And he said, "No, no, no, not y'all. They goin' home." So they left, see, and we went in there and did our session. And that was the beginning of it, bud.

You ever feel like you've been talking about Gene Vincent your whole life? Ever get tired of talking about him?





Well, I tell ya, you never get to the point where you don't talk about him, because there's always some kind of aspect going on where somebody will run into you, musicianwise, or whatever, especially if they have shows in town. Sometimes they'll have shows around here. Chris Isaak was here a couple years ago. Different ones come into town and we get a chance to run by there and talk to 'em and then that just relights the fire, you know? And then with this Internet now -- it used to be everything was by mail. But now, with the Internet, it don't take but 10 tenths of a second to get hold of somebody, and they're always e-mailing from all over. And the younger ones, the younger generation, as far as the music, they're the ones that are taking up on it, you know. Like y'all, playing music. It's rockabilly, but it's a different type of rockabilly. But still, they're the ones that want to know all about what's going on.
What we, me and my bandmates, always admired about Gene Vincent was that he seemed like he was ahead of his time in terms of being kind of wild.
At that time, you know, really, there wasn't too much of that going on.
Yeah, I see in movies and stuff, they just stand there and play.
Yeah, that was the thing back in the '50s, see, that was it. We used to play these shows in the beginning; we had George Jones and Carl Perkins and Roy Orbison and different ones and this and that. We played shows with Johnny Burnette. And at that time, when we were doing all this stuff for them, the big thing for them was just to go out there and do their thing. But hell, we'd go out there and act stupid and fall all over the damn place and jump in the audience and run up and down the aisles and all that. They'd just sit around and look and just think you lost your damn mind!
We played shows with Pat Boone and different ones and so forth, and it was all new, and to a certain extent, at that particular time, the only ones who were doing anything of that nature, I would say, would have been Bill Haley, because he had the boy with the bass -- you know, that would jump up on the bass.
You guys used to throw lit firecrackers at each other?
Oh, yeah, yeah, that's how that hole got in Gene's guitar, you know, out at Capitol. The guy that's the head man out there, Michael Frondelli, he's got a big picture of Gene in his office. So one of the guys from England went out there on a tour one weekend, and he called me and he said, "I just left Capitol from that tour that they have, and I see y'all got your picture in there" -- I don't know who it was next to, one of the big artists that they had. He said, "And I also noticed that the director's got a picture of y'all in his office." He said, "The picture's showing Gene with a guitar with a hole in it." And he said, "I asked the man about it and the man said they put the hole in it so they could put a microphone in it."
So I said, "No, that ain't what happened." I said, "You know what happened, I told you I blew the damn thing up with a firecracker one night." So I called him on the phone one day, Frondelli, and I told him who I was and everything, and I said, "I understand y'all got a couple pictures out there; you have one in your office, that picture of Gene with the guitar, and I understand y'all been telling people that they put that hole in there for a microphone." He said, "Well, that's what we had heard." And I said, "Well, you heard wrong, that hole ain't there for that!"
Do you remember meeting Paul Peek?
Yeah, the first time I met him, we were over at Gene's house. They come over and said they had a new guy they wanted to add to the band, and, I don't know, he just fit right in, man. He was just crazy like all the rest of us, so he just fit right in with everybody, and from then on it was just a go.
He was always kind of a life of the party kind of guy?
Oh yeah. He just fit right in 100 percent, man. Hell, he'd do anything you asked him to do, no problem. He was really easygoing, nice to get along with, real nice guy. It's a shame that this happened because, you know, he was coming back, and when you're coming back like that and, bam, it all ends, man, it's bad.

_________________
Vous etes ici sur le forum
VISITEZ LONELY STREET :

GENE VINCENT
--- NEW !! / http://gene.vincent.fanclub.voila.net/


Le Fan Club Lonely Street sur Myspace international :
http://www.myspace.com/genevincentfanclubfr
RETROUVEZ NOUS SUR FACEBOOK !! http://www.facebook.com/pages/GENE-VINCENT-FAN-CLUB/228785458542
Gene's life year bu year with pictures !

MAIL Joindre Lonely Street : genevincentfrance@yahoo.fr



Lee-Loo
Back to top Go down
Admin Lee-Loo
Admin


Female Nombre de messages : 6995
Localisation : Pyrénées
Date d'inscription : 2007-01-06
Age : 51
Emploi : Fondateur/presidente Lonely Street site/forum/fanClub

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   27.11.08 15:26

I didn't really realize when we were playing with you guys -- he would be singing, and he was a good singer -- but I've heard a couple things that he did when he was young and, man, what a singer!

Yeah. Paul could sing just about anything. He loved that rhythm and blues, and naturally, you know, he loved country. But he could sing just about any damn thing that come along the road there.



I heard this song "Pin the Tail on the Donkey"? It's a dumb song, but man, the singing on it is just so good.
Oh, yeah, that's a good one. He was talented. He really was. And like I said, he loved the business.
What was his music career like? I know he tried to make it as a solo singer and never really hit it big.
Yeah, he never could. You know how it is in this business. I've known people in the business who were, as far as talentwise, they were really what you call great, you know. And they never could get that edge going where they could get 'em a hit record or get out there in front of the public's eye. I don't know what it was. The chemistry just wasn't there. Paul did a lot of stuff and he had a lot of good records out. And I think one time, if I'm not mistaken, he was voted musician of the year in Atlanta. He had a lot of friends; everybody in the business liked him. That's just the way it is sometimes. I know you know people that can really sing and are really talented and you never hear nothin' about 'em, and then there's some that ain't worth a damn, and the next thing you know they say, "Yeah, they had 12 hits in a row!" But he had the charisma and people liked him. I don't know, he just couldn't get that one song off the ground.
Did he make his living at music?
Oh yeah. At one time there, at home, I think he was playin' four, five nights a week, you know.
Just around Atlanta?
Yeah, around Atlanta mostly and everything. They were playing all the clubs and so forth, and I guess then towards the end when he really got sick he had to curtail it to a certain extent.
Is there any one memory of Paul that you have? Your favorite memory?
Well, you know, the Blue Caps were known for some crazy damn things. I think the funniest thing, [in the old days] we were playing in Milwaukee [in the winter], and we had one night off before we played, and Paul had been drinking, and we were sitting in the hotel there, and he was just goofin' off, and he fell asleep on the little cot that we had in the room, see. And the cot was over by the window. So me and Bubba [Tommy Facenda] opened the window and then went out to get some sandwiches, see, just bein' funny, 'cause we did things like that. We used to squirt shaving cream in the bed -- then you got ready to go to sleep, you couldn't go to sleep 'cause it was full of shaving cream. Or if you woke up it'd be all over your face and everything.
So we got back, been gone about an hour, and I told Bubba, I says, "Damn, Bubba, we left that window open, man. It's snowin' and ain't no tellin' what'll happen." So we got back and Paul was sittin' over there on the cot, layin' there, and he had about 2 inches of snow on top of him. So I shook him. I said, "Paul! Paul! Wake up!" And he said, "Damn, it's cold in here, boys! Cut the heat on!" So we brushed the snow off of him. But I swear to God he had about 2 inches of snow on him, and after that every time we got together that's all we'd talk about.
Hell, the Blue Caps were known for craziness. We had good times. There's always things you could remember Paul by because he was in the middle of everything, and like I said, he was easygoing. Really gonna miss him, 'cause the boy was nice, and he was nice to get along with. I guess it just was his time to go, son.
He was a musician's musician. He loved what he did. He'd give you the shirt off his damn back, man. He loved musicians and he loved the music, and he just wanted to be part of it. He hung in there as long as he could. You can't stay around here forever.

_________________
Vous etes ici sur le forum
VISITEZ LONELY STREET :

GENE VINCENT
--- NEW !! / http://gene.vincent.fanclub.voila.net/


Le Fan Club Lonely Street sur Myspace international :
http://www.myspace.com/genevincentfanclubfr
RETROUVEZ NOUS SUR FACEBOOK !! http://www.facebook.com/pages/GENE-VINCENT-FAN-CLUB/228785458542
Gene's life year bu year with pictures !

MAIL Joindre Lonely Street : genevincentfrance@yahoo.fr



Lee-Loo
Back to top Go down
Jeff



Male Nombre de messages : 191
Localisation : Aveyron
Date d'inscription : 2008-09-05
Age : 51
Emploi : .

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   29.11.08 17:20

Yo! Je suis en train, non de siffler 3 fois, mais de m'attaquer à la traduc'. C'est long, et je fais 10000 trucs à la fois! Aussi, lecteur non anglophone, sois patient!!! Dans le courant de la semaine prochaine, je te promets que tu te repaitras d'un texte compréhensible!
Back to top Go down
Jeff



Male Nombre de messages : 191
Localisation : Aveyron
Date d'inscription : 2008-09-05
Age : 51
Emploi : .

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   30.11.08 11:34

V'la déja un début!






12 avril 2001/ Dickie « Be Bop » Harrell était le
batteur original des Blue Caps de Gene Vincent. Sa façon de jouer brossée
contenue et les hurlements en arrière-plan sur le 1er & plus
célèbre succès de Vincent (Be Bop A Lula) a donné à cet enregistrement (un des
disques phare du début du Rock & Roll) une grande part de sa tension et de
son émotion.


Natif de Norfolk, Va., comme
Vincent, Harrell a commencé de jouer
avec Vincent alors qu’il n’avait que 15 ans. Vincent, alors dans la Marine, s’était sévèrement
blessé la jambe dans un accident de moto, et récupérait dans un hôpital de la Marine. Harrell est resté avec
les Blue Caps un peu plus d’un an, avant d’arrêter, rasé par la vie sur la
route. Vincent & les Blue Caps eurent une brouille monétaire à la fin des
50’s, et Vincent, déjà handicapé par sa 1e blessure, fut blessé à
nouveau dans l’accident de voiture qui tua Eddie Cochran, un ami et l’une des
Stars du Rock des débuts. Son succès déclina aux USA, mais il demeurait une
figure de scène populaire en Angleterre,
où il était un héros pour, entre autres, les Beatles, dont le look en cuir noir
de leurs débuts était une imitation de Vincent.


Vincent est mort en 71,
alcoolique et pratiquement oublié. Il fut introduit à titre posthume au RnR
Hall of Fame en 1998.


Dickie Harrell a travaillé
pendant 37 ans pour le Gouvernement, sur des produits dangereux, avant de
prendre sa retraite il y a 2 ans. Il vend maintenant des produits dérivés des
Blue Caps. A travers les ans, 4 des Blue Caps encore en vie (Harrell, le
guitariste Johnny Meeks et les vocalistes Tommy Facenda & Paul Peek) se
sont occasionnellement réunis pour jouer les succès de Vincent, pour des
festivals rockabilly ou d’autres spectacles. Je les ai rencontré alors que mon
groupe partageait l’affiche avec eux pendant une tournée d’une semaine en
Californie en 1996. Cette semaine, Harrell m’a parlé au téléphone de sa maison
de Portsmouth, Va., à propos de Vincent et de Peek, mort récemment à l’âge de
63 ans.


-
Comment t’es-tu
mis en cheville avec Gene quand tu avais seulement 15 ans ?


-
Eh bien, je
jouais avec un de ces groupes, à l’époque, sur la station de radio WCMS. J’y
passais tout mon temps après l’école. Ils avaient ce spectacle, et Shériff
(Tex) Davis, il en était l’un des responsables, il m’a dit un jour « On a
ce marin qui vient et veut chanter ce weekend. Il s’est cassé la jambe, alors
il est ici à l’hôpital. Il viendra sans doute vendredi. Tu as une chance, amène
toi et je te présenterai ». Alors, j’y suis allé, et Gene est sorti de l’ascenseur
et il avait 2 béquilles, toute sa fichue jambe était plâtrée et tout. On a
discuté et tout ça, et il chanté une chanson ou deux. Après son départ, Bill
(Shériff Tex) m’a dit « t’en penses quoi ? », et j’ai dit
« hey, c’est bon ! ». Alors, on s’est réuni et on est allé à cet
endroit (pour le spectacle), car on avait l’habitude de jouer derrière certains
des gars au spectacle. La 1e nuit là-bas, Bill Davis, s’est amené,
s’est présenté, et il a dit qu’il y avait ce gars qui venait, qu’il était dans la Marine, à l’hôsto et tout
le bazar, et il (Vincent) s’est pointé et a fait son truc et, bon sang, il les
a rendu dingues. Ils sont devenus dingues. Parce qu’ils n’avaient pas
l’habitude de voir ça, surtout pour Gene, et avec la jambe comme il l’avait, et
il jouait avec le micro, et tout ces bons trucs. Alors, de ce jour, chaque
semaine, bon sang, l’endroit était bourré à craquer, et si tu venais pas à
l’avance pour voir le spectacle, tu rentrais pas.


-
[L’amitié entre
Davis et Ken Nelson chez Capitol Records a aidé Gene à avoir un contrat
d’enregistrement]. Mais, tu vois, ils ne voulaient pas le groupe. Ken Nelson,
tout ce qu’il voulait, c’était Gene, parce qu’ils avaient les meilleurs
musiciens du monde. Et Bill lui a parlé d’utiliser le groupe. Il lui a dit
« essaye les ». Et il lui a dit « si ça marche pas, renvoie les
chez eux ». Alors on s’est réuni, on a parlé de ce qu’on allait faire, et
on est parti là-bas (Nashville), on est allé au studio et on a rencontré M.
Nelson et Owen Bradley, et y’avait tous ces fichus musiciens assis tout autour.
Et j’ai demandé à Cliff, j’ai dit « Qu’est-ce qu’il se passe ici, nom de
Dieu ? ». Il a dit « J’en sais rien, je suppose qu’ils viennent
de finir une session, ou un truc du genre ». Donc, ils étaient assis dans
un coin du studio, et Gene a fait 2 ou 3 couplets de « Race with the
Devil » et « Be Bop A Lula », et tout ça, et Ken Nelson est
sorti du truc, là, et a dit « C’est bon, vous pouvez tous rentrer
maintenant ». Nom de Dieu ! J’ai pensé qu’il nous parlait. Alors, j’ai
commencé à ranger mes affaires et il a dit « non, non, pas vous.
Eux ». Alors, ils sont partis, tu vois, et on est rentré à l’intérieur et
on a fait nos sessions. Et ce fut le début de tout, mon pote ».
Back to top Go down
Admin Lee-Loo
Admin


Female Nombre de messages : 6995
Localisation : Pyrénées
Date d'inscription : 2007-01-06
Age : 51
Emploi : Fondateur/presidente Lonely Street site/forum/fanClub

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   30.11.08 14:23

Very Happy super Jeff sunny

_________________
Vous etes ici sur le forum
VISITEZ LONELY STREET :

GENE VINCENT
--- NEW !! / http://gene.vincent.fanclub.voila.net/


Le Fan Club Lonely Street sur Myspace international :
http://www.myspace.com/genevincentfanclubfr
RETROUVEZ NOUS SUR FACEBOOK !! http://www.facebook.com/pages/GENE-VINCENT-FAN-CLUB/228785458542
Gene's life year bu year with pictures !

MAIL Joindre Lonely Street : genevincentfrance@yahoo.fr



Lee-Loo
Back to top Go down
floke94



Male Nombre de messages : 726
Localisation : val de marne
Date d'inscription : 2007-04-19
Age : 51
Emploi : agent de maitrise/cariste

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   01.12.08 4:18

cheers Merci Jeff

amitiés Henry
Back to top Go down
boogie boy
Membre Fan Club


Male Nombre de messages : 1688
Localisation : France
Date d'inscription : 2007-05-13
Age : 45
Emploi : Roller (free wheel)

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   01.12.08 23:14

et JEFF!
Back to top Go down
Jeff



Male Nombre de messages : 191
Localisation : Aveyron
Date d'inscription : 2008-09-05
Age : 51
Emploi : .

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   02.12.08 11:24

INTERVIEW SUITE :





T’as jamais eu le sentiment d’avoir Parlé de Gene
toute ta vie ? T’en as jamais eu assez ?






Ben, je vais te dire. T’en
arrive jamais au point où tu ne parles pas de lui, parce qu’il y a toujours des
facteurs qui font que quelqu’un va venir vers toi, musicalement, ou autre,
surtout s’ils ont des spectacles en ville. Parfois, ils ont des spectacles dans
le coin. Chris Isaak est passé il y a 2 ans. D’autres viennent en ville, et on
a la chance de se rencontrer et discuter et alors, du coup, ça rallume le feu, tu
vois ? Et maintenant, avec cet Internet… A l’époque, tout se faisait par
courrier. Mais maintenant, avec Internet, il te faut un 10e de
secondes pour être en contact avec quelqu’un, et on m’envoie des mails du monde
entier. Et les plus jeunes, la jeune génération, en ce qui concerne la musique,
ce sont eux qui s’en emparent, tu sais. Comme vous tous, en jouant de la
musique. C’est du rockabilly, mais d’un genre différent. Mais quoi qu’il en
soit, c’est eux qui veulent savoir tout
ce qui se passe. Ce que nous, moi et le reste du groupe, avons toujours admiré
chez Gene, c’était qu’il semblait être en avance sur son temps en termes de
sauvagerie.


A cette époque, tu sais,
c’était pas trop la façon de faire.





Ouais, je le vois dans les films ou autres, ils se
tiennent raide et jouent.






Ouais, c’était la façon, dans
les 50’s, tu vois. C’était comme ça. On jouait dans ces spectacles, au tout
début. On avait George jones et Carl Perkins et Roy Orbison et d’autres et tout
ça. On jouait avec Johnny Burnette. A cette époque, quand nous faisions toutes ces dates avec
eux, le grand truc pour eux, c’était d’y être et faire leur truc. Mais,
putain ! nous on faisait les cons, on se roulait par terre, on sautait
dans le public, on courait dans toute la salle et tout ça. Ils étaient assis
dans un coin, à regarder et à se dire qu’on avait perdu la boule !


On a fait des spectacles avec
Pat Boone et d’autres, et ainsi de suite, et tout ça, c’était nouveau, et
jusqu’à un certain point, à ce moment précis, les seuls qui faisaient quelque chose du même genre c’était, je
dirais, Bill Haley, parce qu’il avait ce gars à la contrebasse – tu sais, celui
qui y grimpait dessus.





Vous aviez l’habitude de vous jeter des pétards
allumés entre vous ?






Oh ouais, ouais, c’est comme
ça qu’il y a eu un trou dans la guitare de Gene, tu sais, chez Capitol. Le gars
qui en est à la tête, Michael Frondelli, il a une grande photo de Gene dans son
bureau. Un jour, un gars d’Angleterre est allé là-bas en visite un weekend, et
il m’a téléphoné et m’a dit « je viens juste de finir une visite organisée par
Capitol, et j’ai vu que vous y aviez tous votre photo »… je sais pas à
côté de qui, un grand artiste qu’ils avaient. Il a dit « Et j’ai aussi vu
que le directeur avait une photo de vous, dans son bureau. La photo montre Gene avec un trou dans sa guitare. J’ai
demandé au type quelle en était la raison,
et le type a dit qu’ils avaient fait ce trou pour y mettre un
micro ».


Alors j’ai dit « non,
c’est pas ce qui c’est passé ». J’ai dit « tu sais ce qu’il s’est
passé, je vais te le dire. J’ai explosé tout le fichu bazar avec un pétard, un
soir ». Alors, je l’ai appelé au téléphone un jour, Fondrelli, je lui ai
dit qui j’étais et tout ça, et j’ai dit « je crois savoir que vous avez une paire de photos de nous. Vous en avez une
dans votre bureau, ce pportrait de Gene avec la guitare, et je crois savoir que
vous dites à tout le monde que le trou avait été fait pour y mettre un
micro ». Il a dit « c’est ce qu’on a entendu » et j’ai dit
« alors, vous avez mal entendu, ce trou est pas là pour ça ! ».





Tu te rappelles ta rencontre avec Paul Peek ?





Ouais. La 1e fois
où je l’ai rencontré, c’était chez Gene. Ils sont arrivés, et ils ont dit
qu’ils avaient un nouveau type qu’ils voulaient ajouter au groupe et, je sais
pas, il a fait l’affaire impec, mec. Il était aussi dingue que nous, alors il
s’est intégré au poil et l’affaire était faite.





Il était toujours du genre à faire la fête ? (pas trop sûr de ma traduction, là ! Jeff)





Oh ouais. Il a fait l’affaire
à 100%, mec. Putain ! Il faisait tout ce qu’on lui demandait de faire,
sans problème. Il était vraiment facile à vivre, intéressant à fréquenter, un
vrai chic type. C’est une honte ce qui lui est arrivé, parce que tu sais, il
était en train de revenir, et quand tu reviens comme ça, et boum ! tout
s’arrête, mec, c’est pas bien.





Je l’avais pas réalisé quand on jouait avec vous, les
gars… Il chantait, et c’était un bon chanteur…mais j’ai entendu 2/3 trucs qu’il
a fait quand il était jeune, et mec, quel chanteur !






Ouais, Paul pouvait tout
chanter. Il aimait le RnB et, naturellement, tu sais, il aimait la Country. Mais il pouvait
chanter n’importe quel truc qui
apparaissait.
Back to top Go down
Jeff



Male Nombre de messages : 191
Localisation : Aveyron
Date d'inscription : 2008-09-05
Age : 51
Emploi : .

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   03.12.08 9:26

SUITE ET FIN





J’ai entendu cette chanson « Pin the tail on the
donkey ». C’est une chanson idiote,
mais, mec, le chant est si bon.






Oh ouais, il est bon. Il
avait du talent. Vraiment. Et comme je le disais, il aimait le bizness.





Comment était sa carrière ? Je sais qu’il a
essayé de percer comme chanteur solo et n’a jamais vraiment eu de succès.






Ouais, il n’a jamais pu. Tu
sais comment c’est, dans ce métier. J’ai connu des gens dans ce métier qui
étaient, du point de vue talent, qui étaient de l’étoffe des grands, tu sais.
Et ils n’ont jamais chopé ce petit truc qui te fait avoir un tube ou capte
l’attention du public. Je ne sais pas pourquoi. L’alchimie ne s’est pas faite. Paul a enregistré
beaucoup de matos et a sorti un tas de bons disques. Et je crois qu’une fois, si
je ne me trompe, il a été élu musicien de l’année à Atlanta. Il avait beaucoup
d’amis ; tout le monde dans le métier l’aimait. C’est comme ça que ça se
passe, parfois. Je sais que tu connais des gens qui savent chanter et qui sont
très talentueux, et dont on entend jamais parler, et d’autres qui valent pas un
clou et on te dit « ouais, ils ont eu 12 tubes d’affilé !». Mais il
avait du charisme, et les gens l’aimaient. Je sais pas, il a jamais réussi à
sortir La chanson.





Est-ce qu’il vivait de sa musique ?





Oh ouais. Fut un temps, je
crois qu’il jouait 4/5 soirs par semaine, ici, à la maison, tu sais.





Rien qu’autour d’Atlanta ?





Ouais, surtout autour
d’Atlanta et tout. Ils jouaient dans tous les clubs et compagnie. Mais vers la
fin, quand il a été malade, il a du mettre la pédale douce.





As-tu un souvenir particulier de Paul ? Ton
meilleur souvenir ?






Ben, tu sais, les Blue Caps
étaient connus pour faire des trucs dingues. Je crois que le truc le plus
marrant, à cette époque, c’était 1 hiver et on jouait à Milwaukee, et on a eu
une soirée de libre avant de jouer, et Paul avait picolé, et on glandouillait à
l’hôtel et il était dans les vapes et il s’est endormi dans le lit de camp
qu’on avait dans la chambre, tu vois. Et le lit de camp était près de la fenêtre.
Alors, moi et Bubba (Tommy Facenda), on a ouvert la fenêtre, et on est parti se
chercher des sandwiches, tu vois, juste
pour rire, car on faisait des trucs comme ça. On avait l’habitude de répandre
de la crème à raser dans les lits…Quand tu voulais dormir, tu pouvais pas car
le pieu était plein de crème. Ou alors, à ton réveil t’en avais partout. Bon,
on est revenu, on était parti bien pendant une heure, et j’ai dit à Bubba
« Nom de Dieu, Bubba ! On a laissé la fenêtre ouverte, mec. Il neige,
et j’te dis pas c’qui va arriver ». Quand on est rentré, Paul était
toujours endormi sur le lit de camp, et il avait à peu près 5 cm de neige sur lui. Je l’ai
secoué, j’ai dit « Paul ! Paul ! Réveille toi ! » et
il a répondu « putain, ça caille ici, les gars ! Mettez le
chauffage ! ». On l’a
débarrassé de la neige. Mais je jure devant Dieu qu’il avait au moins 5 cm de neige sur lui, et de
ce jour, à chaque fois qu’on était ensemble, on ne parlait que de ça. Nom de
dieu ! Les Blue Caps étaient connus pour leur dinguerie. On a eu des bons moments. Il y a toujours des trucs qui te rappellent
Paul car il était de tous les coups, et comme je l’ai dit, il était facile à
vivre. Il va vraiment me manquer, car ce garçon était chouette, et c’était
chouette de le fréquenter. Je pense que c’était son heure, fiston. Il était le
musicien des musiciens, et il aimait la musique, et il voulait en faire partie.
Il s’y est accroché aussi longtemps
qu’il a pu. Tu peux pas rester dans les parages pour toujours.
Back to top Go down
crazytime42
Membre Fan Club


Male Nombre de messages : 303
Localisation : St Etienne
Date d'inscription : 2007-10-12
Age : 68
Emploi : inactif

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   03.12.08 13:06

supre bon boulot JEFF
Back to top Go down
Jeff



Male Nombre de messages : 191
Localisation : Aveyron
Date d'inscription : 2008-09-05
Age : 51
Emploi : .

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   03.12.08 13:12

J'accepte humblement vos remerciements et félicitations!
Back to top Go down
Admin Lee-Loo
Admin


Female Nombre de messages : 6995
Localisation : Pyrénées
Date d'inscription : 2007-01-06
Age : 51
Emploi : Fondateur/presidente Lonely Street site/forum/fanClub

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   03.12.08 16:02

Jeff
Dickie a bcp parlé de Paul, j'esperais + de Gene

mais ""Les Blue Caps étaient connus pour leur dinguerie.""
sympa les anecdotes
Ils ont du vraiment se marrer

Very Happy geek

_________________
Vous etes ici sur le forum
VISITEZ LONELY STREET :

GENE VINCENT
--- NEW !! / http://gene.vincent.fanclub.voila.net/


Le Fan Club Lonely Street sur Myspace international :
http://www.myspace.com/genevincentfanclubfr
RETROUVEZ NOUS SUR FACEBOOK !! http://www.facebook.com/pages/GENE-VINCENT-FAN-CLUB/228785458542
Gene's life year bu year with pictures !

MAIL Joindre Lonely Street : genevincentfrance@yahoo.fr



Lee-Loo
Back to top Go down
Jeff



Male Nombre de messages : 191
Localisation : Aveyron
Date d'inscription : 2008-09-05
Age : 51
Emploi : .

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   03.12.08 16:05

n'oublie pas qu'à la base cette interview était consacrée à Peek! Espèce de Vincentophile (ou phage, je sais pas trop!!!!)lol!
Back to top Go down
Admin Lee-Loo
Admin


Female Nombre de messages : 6995
Localisation : Pyrénées
Date d'inscription : 2007-01-06
Age : 51
Emploi : Fondateur/presidente Lonely Street site/forum/fanClub

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   03.12.08 16:08

oui je sais je suis une obsédée ... de Gene lol!
phile, phage, je prends tout
rendeer

_________________
Vous etes ici sur le forum
VISITEZ LONELY STREET :

GENE VINCENT
--- NEW !! / http://gene.vincent.fanclub.voila.net/


Le Fan Club Lonely Street sur Myspace international :
http://www.myspace.com/genevincentfanclubfr
RETROUVEZ NOUS SUR FACEBOOK !! http://www.facebook.com/pages/GENE-VINCENT-FAN-CLUB/228785458542
Gene's life year bu year with pictures !

MAIL Joindre Lonely Street : genevincentfrance@yahoo.fr



Lee-Loo
Back to top Go down
boogie boy
Membre Fan Club


Male Nombre de messages : 1688
Localisation : France
Date d'inscription : 2007-05-13
Age : 45
Emploi : Roller (free wheel)

PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   03.12.08 20:27



JEFF IS THE BEST! cheers
Si c'est le meme Paul Peek ...ça se confirme! C'est tres bon!
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Interview de Dickie Harrel   Today at 22:54

Back to top Go down
 
Interview de Dickie Harrel
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» [Interview] Chat sur Habbo.it : "Gustav & Georg sont là, près de moi"
» [Interview] Bill Kaulitz pour Stern magazine
» Interview fred schneider
» [Interview] GQ : Tokio Hotel - Pourquoi vous devez maintenant prendre les Super-jumeaux au sérieux !
» [Interview] Tokio Hotel réponds aux questions d'NRJ.de

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Gene Vincent Lonely Street Forum :: Click : Dickie Harrell - membre d'honneur du fan club-
Jump to: